How do IoT and Big Data affect the Data Center?

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Getting Data Centers Ready for Big Data

Big Data has become a popular term for the vast amounts of data that is flowing into our data centers with increasing velocity and variety. The Internet of Things (IoT) constitutes a growing part of Big Data as it arrives in terabytes or exabytes (1,000,000 TB) per data set.

Since IoT and Big Data arrive at a higher velocity than traditional data, it is not only more difficult to analyze, but can also put additional stress on data centers. Where traditional data is highly structured, data from the IoT will not be nicely packaged and will likely be unstructured in nature.

How do IoT and Big Data affect the data center?

The research firm Gartner, Inc. believes that the IoT will include 26 billion units sending data to be processed by 2020. They also expect that the product and service supplier market for IoT will create revenue exceeding $300 billion in the same timeframe. According to Gartner, “The Internet of Things (IoT) has a potential transformational effect on the data center market, its customers, technology providers, technologies, and sales and marketing models.”

All of this data will need to be processed and analyzed which will increase the workload for data centers, forcing them to deal with new capacity, security, and analytics problems.

Joe Skorupa, vice president and distinguished analyst with Gartner said, “The enormous number of devices, coupled with the sheer volume, velocity and structure of IoT data, creates challenges, particularly in the areas of security, data, storage management, servers and the data center network, as real-time business processes are at stake. Data center managers will need to deploy more forward-looking capacity management in these areas to be able to proactively meet the business priorities associated with IoT.”

Conclusion

The Internet of Things is going to have an impact on storage management practices in data centers across the world. These data centers will need to radically increase infrastructure resources and storage capacity to be ready to handle the Internet of Things-related data.

Bandwidth will also be affected in both businesses and data centers. The Internet of Things is going to shift the trend away from old lower speed WAN links to higher-speed connections that are able to handle all of the small messages coming from the devices that comprise the IoT.

Data centers must start preparing for the additional storage, processing, and bandwidth required for Big Data and the Internet of Things. Of course, in order to handle this additional load, data centers will also face challenges with increased virtualization, which requires additional power and cooling to handle the additional load.

The Internet of Things (IoT): All Talk or Transforming Your Data Center?

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Ready for the next big tech revolution? Some experts argue for the Internet of Things (IoT) which is primed to storm the market by connecting devices of all shapes and sizes — from traditional server hardware to point-of-sale terminals and parking spaces. As noted by a Deutsche Bank study, however, hype currently outpaces revenue by a large margin; is IoT all talk, or on track to transform your data center?
Practically Speaking
When it comes to IoT, “stuff” might be a better descriptor, according to Intel’s Genevieve Bell. Speaking at MIT Technology Review’s Digital Summit, Bell argued that “things” implies connections of the same item over and over again, while an “Internet of Stuff” is more accurate: A collection of varied devices, from lawn mowers to lightswitches. In her view, reasons for using IoT vary significantly across corporations or municipalities, meaning there’s no “right” way to implement this technology, and no set rules about what gets connected.

Want a more practical example? Deutsche Bank details an IoT use case focusing on “smart retail.” It starts with IoT sensors at the physical store level, which monitor time-sensitive, transactional data such as inventory levels, product sales metrics, and customer volumes. And it goes beyond point-of-sale and stock room controls to include wireless parking sensors, motion detectors, and even environmental metrics. The goal is to provide a holistic revenue image; one that accounts for changes in weather, traffic patterns or varying product stock levels in real-time. The study sees wireline and mobile IoT end-points sending data through an edge cloud, into the data center, then distributed among data analytics, ERP, and IoT control apps.

No Small Feat
Right now, big data focuses on information generated from standard collection systems, but imagine the flow-rate change if every business unit had access to cost-effective wireless, mobile sensors. “Big data” doesn’t do it justice; research firm Gartner predicts that by 2020, the IoT will connect 26 billion devices, all transmitting a continuous stream of information.

The result? Transformation is coming as IoT-enabled devices begin penetrating the market. Companies looking to future-proof their data centers have two options: Managed hosting or colocation. Managed hosting shifts data center responsibility to a provider and utilizes that provider’s hardware to store, analyze and manipulate data. Colocation, meanwhile, keeps hardware ownership with your company but contracts out physical cabinet storage, power, cooling, and support. With IoT technologies set to create diffuse networks of heterogeneous devices, increased cabinet density through intelligent power management can help maximize server efficacy.

IoT won’t transform your data center tomorrow, but in five years companies that haven’t future-proofed their cabinets will find it difficult to generate ROI from this nebulous network of devices. Now is the time to consider server best practices and potential — when value catches up with vision, you’ll be ready.

– See more at: http://www.vxchnge.com/blog/internet-things-iot-talk-transforming-data-center/#sthash.sJ2hGncX.dpuf

When it comes to IoT, “stuff” might be a better descriptor, according to Intel’s Genevieve Bell. Speaking at MIT Technology Review’s Digital Summit, Bell argued that “things” implies connections of the same item over and over again, while an “Internet of Stuff” is more accurate: A collection of varied devices, from lawn mowers to light switches. In her view, reasons for using IoT vary significantly across corporations or municipalities, meaning there’s no “right” way to implement this technology, and no set rules about what gets connected.

Want a more practical example? Deutsche Bank details an IoT use case focusing on “smart retail.” It starts with IoT sensors at the physical store level, which monitor time-sensitive, transactional data such as inventory levels, product sales metrics, and customer volumes. And it goes beyond point-of-sale and stock room controls to include wireless parking sensors, motion detectors, and even environmental metrics. The goal is to provide a holistic revenue image; one that accounts for changes in weather, traffic patterns or varying product stock levels in real-time. The study sees wireline and mobile IoT end-points sending data through an edge cloud, into the data center, then distributed among data analytics, ERP, and IoT control apps.

 

No Small Feat

Right now, big data focuses on information generated from standard collection systems, but imagine the flow-rate change if every business unit had access to cost-effective wireless, mobile sensors. “Big data” doesn’t do it justice; research firm Gartner predicts that by 2020, the IoT will connect 26 billion devices, all transmitting a continuous stream of information .

The result? Transformation is coming as IoT-enabled devices begin penetrating the market. Companies looking to future-proof their data centers have two options: Managed hosting or colocation. Managed hosting shifts data center responsibility to a provider and utilizes that provider’s hardware to store, analyze and manipulate data. Colocation, meanwhile, keeps hardware ownership with your company but contracts out physical cabinet storage, power, cooling, and support. With IoT technologies set to create diffuse networks of heterogeneous devices, increased cabinet density through intelligent power management can help maximize server efficacy.

IoT won’t transform your data center tomorrow, but in five years companies that haven’t future-proofed their cabinets will find it difficult to generate ROI from this nebulous network of devices. Now is the time to consider server best practices and potential — when value catches up with vision, you’ll be ready.

– See more at: http://www.vxchnge.com/blog/internet-things-iot-talk-transforming-data-center/#sthash.sJ2hGncX.dpuf